Patent Claims Demystified: What They Are and How to Patent Your Invention

2022-05-05

Last updated: 5 months ago

This article will introduce the different types of patent claims and explain what each one means.

Share this post


Introduction

Patents are a complex area of intellectual property law, and the different types of patent claims can be confusing for those not familiar with the area.

A patent claim is a statement of the invention for which protection is sought in a patent application.

The claims define, in technical terms, the scope of protection conferred by a patent.

The claims are part of the patent that is legally binding, and determine what the invention is and what protection the inventor is entitled to.

This article will introduce the different types of patent claims and explain what each one means.

Where to Find the Patent Claims

Patent claims are located at the end of a patent document and define the invention covered by the patent.

The claims must be specific enough to cover the invention, but they cannot be too specific, or they might not be allowed by the patent office. Again, they should be clear and concise and must define the invention in terms of structure, function, or both.

When a patent is issued, the claims define the invention that the patentee has the right to exclude others from making, using, or selling. The claims also define the invention that the patentee can enforce against infringers in a lawsuit.

A claim can be divided into two parts: (1) the preamble and (2) the body. The preamble is an introductory statement that identifies the field of the invention and the background of the invention. The body defines the invention in terms of one or more limitations.

When drafting claims, it is important to consider the invention, how it works, and what it does.

 For instance, an example of a patent claim is:

 "A computer system comprising: a processor; a memory coupled to the processor; and a storage device coupled to the memory, the storage device configured to store data."

This claim covers a computer system with a processor, memory, and storage device. The claim defines the invention structure-wise (processor, memory, and storage device) and function (configured to store data).

What are the Different Types of Patent Claims?

When filing a patent application, it's important to include different claims. This will help protect your invention from being copied or imitated by others. Let's explore the different types of claims you might include in your application.

Independent Claims

An independent claim stands on its own. It doesn't depend on any other claims in the application. An independent claim is typically broader in scope than a dependent claim and can be more difficult to prove in court.

For example, let's say you have invented a new widget type. In your first claim, you might describe the widget in general terms. Next, you might describe the widget in more detail, including specific dimensions and features. And in your third claim, you might describe a particular use for the widget. Each of these claims would be independent of the others.

Here's an example of a patent claim:

1. A widget comprising a body and a first member connected to the body, the first member being rotatable with respect to the body.

The above is an independent claim because it stands on its own. It doesn't reference any other claims in the application.

Dependent Claims

A dependent claim depends on a previous claim. In other words, it can't stand on its own. A dependent claim must reference one or more specific elements of a previous claim to be valid. This helps define the invention more narrowly and can be very useful in protecting your invention from competitors.

For example, let's say you have invented a new widget type. In your first claim, you might describe the widget in general terms. Second, you might describe the widget in more detail, including specific dimensions and features. And in your third claim, you might describe a particular use for the widget. Each of these claims would build upon the previous one, and each would be dependent on the previous claim.

2. A widget as in claim 1, wherein the first member is cylindrical.

This is a dependent claim because it depends on claim 1. It narrows the scope of the invention by specifying that the first member is cylindrical.

Means plus function claim

A means plus function claim is a type of claim in patent law that specifically identifies how a function is accomplished and the function itself. The claim will typically recite a generic structure plus a function, for example, "a widget comprising a first means for performing a first function and a second means for performing a second function." A means plus function claim allows the patentee to cover any structure that performs the claimed function. For example, if a patentee claims a "means for generating a signal," the claim covers any future structure capable of generating a signal, irrespective of its implementation.

Apparatus claim

Apparatus patent claims typically recite a particular design for the invention. The claim will typically recite a list of structural elements, for example, "a widget comprising a first element, a second element, and a third element." An apparatus claim allows the patentee to cover any device that includes the claimed structure. For example, if a patentee claims an "apparatus comprising a housing and a display," the claim covers any future device that includes a housing and a display, regardless of what the device is used for.

Method claim

A method claim in a patent application is a claim that defines a method or series of steps that can be performed to achieve a particular result. A method claim is written in a very specific way, using several terms with specific meanings. The claim will typically recite a list of steps, for example, "a widget comprising a first step, a second step, and a third step." A method claim allows the patentee to cover any process that includes the claimed steps. For example, if a patentee claims a "method comprising the step of generating a signal," the claim covers any future process that includes the step of generating a signal, regardless of what the signal is used for.

Composition claim

A composition patent claim typically covers a particular combination of ingredients or elements used in a product or service. The claim will typically recite a list of ingredients, for example, "a widget comprising ingredient A, ingredient B, and ingredient C." The purpose of a composition claim is to allow the patentee to cover any material that includes the claimed ingredients.

RELATED ARTICLE: How to Identify Patent Pending Infringement & What to Do

In Conclusion

There are different types of patent claims, each with its strengths and weaknesses, so it is important to understand which type is most appropriate for your invention. It is important to understand the different types of patent claims and how they can be used to make the most effective patent application,

 Independent patent claims describe the invention in its simplest form. On the other hand, dependent patent claims add additional limitations to the invention and are often used to cover alternative embodiments of the invention. Means plus function claims are used to cover functional elements of the invention, while apparatus claims cover the physical embodiment of the invention. Additionally, method claims describe how the invention is used, while composition claims describe the invention's ingredients.

With a strong patent application, you can protect your invention from infringement and ensure that you are the first to bring your invention to market.

FAQs Section 

Q: What should be included in patent claims?

A: Claims should include all of the invention's essential features and be clear and concise.

Q: What is the difference between patent claims and specifications?

A: The patent specification should fully describe the invention, including its features and how it works. Patent claims are a more concise summary of the invention and define what is protected by the patent.

Q: Can I make changes to my patent claims after I file my application?

A: Yes, you can make changes to your claims during the patent examination process. However, any changes you make must still meet the criteria for patentability.


Read more posts

Chat